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12 newly revived Frank Lloyd Wright designs for your next project

Throughout the course of his legendary career, Frank Lloyd Wright designed thousands of furniture and decor items spanning dining room sets to office desks, textiles, vases and tablewares. In 1955—just four years before his death—he launched a licensing program that sparked dozens of high-profile brand partnerships for decades to come. From ergonomic office desks to teakwood-clad sh...

Throughout the course of his legendary career, Frank Lloyd Wright designed thousands of furniture and decor items spanning dining room sets to office desks, textiles, vases and tablewares. In 1955—just four years before his death—he launched a licensing program that sparked dozens of high-profile brand partnerships for decades to come. From ergonomic office desks to teakwood-clad showerheads, here are a dozen Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation–approved products to try in your next project.

Updated replicas of the multilevel workstations in the iconic SC Johnson Administration Building, the Frank Lloyd Wright Racine Signature desk and guest chair by Steelcase is outfitted with swiveling filing cabinets and a rich terra cotta finish.

Like one of Wright’s sweeping, Prairie-style residential designs, the Frank Lloyd Wright 21" Single-Function Raincan showerhead by Brizo boasts a horizontal canopy and integrated lighting to boot.

Hand-crafted by American artisans in Florence, Alabama, the Frank Lloyd Wright Taliesin 1 table lamp by AlaModerna offers an authentic reproduction of one of Wright’s most recognizable lighting designs.

The rounded silhouette of the Frank Lloyd Wright Chef Series Arch serving board and cutting boards by Epicurean for Crate & Barrel draws inspiration from the shapes of Wright’s stained glass windows.

The Frank Lloyd Wright Racine lounge chair by Steelcase is the first-ever public introduction of a design by Wright for the SC Johnson building in 1939, available in new materials and colorways.

The Frank Lloyd Wright Widespread Lavatory faucet and handles by Brizo are designed with a cantilevered spout to create a side-flowing stream that evokes a waterfall.

The bold rectilinear pattern in the Frank Lloyd Wright Oak Park Skylight pillow cover by Levinsohn Textile Company pays homage to the skylights that adorned the entrance of Wright’s first studio in Oak Park, Illinois.

AlaModerna’s architectural Frank Lloyd Wright Taliesin 2 floor lamp resembles the light-box-style pendants Wright employed in his own home.

Inspired by the writing tables in the SC Johnson Administration Building, the Frank Lloyd Wright Racine utility table by Steelcase is available in five sizes and three finishes, including warm white, black and burnished bronze.

The Frank Lloyd Wright tissue holder by Brizo is an ode to the late architect’s belief that rooms should be designed as a unified whole, down to the diminutive details.

The Frank Lloyd Wright Chef Series utensils (set of five) by Epicurean for Crate & Barrel showcase a curvilinear motif based on one of Wright’s personal graphic designs.

Composed of thick cherrywood veneered MDF, the Frank Lloyd Wright Storer House trivet by AlaModerna mimics the textile-inspired, patterned concrete blocks Wright used to construct the legendary John Storer House in 1923.

Homepage photo: The Frank Lloyd Wright Racine Signature desk and guest chair by Steelcase | Courtesy of Steelcase

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Discover the Most Popular Design Style in Your State

Each state in the US flaunts their own distinct features and are each different in their own ways which is one of the biggest aspects in what makes our country unique. Whether it is the Southwest’s stucco exteriors and terra cotta roofs, the Northeast’s traditional brick exteriors, and shuttered windows, or the Pacific Northwest’s use of natural wood and stone, each region integrates their individual culture and geographic landscapes into their home design. But have you ever wondered what the top style of home is in your ow...

Each state in the US flaunts their own distinct features and are each different in their own ways which is one of the biggest aspects in what makes our country unique. Whether it is the Southwest’s stucco exteriors and terra cotta roofs, the Northeast’s traditional brick exteriors, and shuttered windows, or the Pacific Northwest’s use of natural wood and stone, each region integrates their individual culture and geographic landscapes into their home design. But have you ever wondered what the top style of home is in your own state? Luckily Encino Real Estate did the research for us, using Google Trends data to find the top interior design styles in each state.

The study revealed the modern farmhouse style as a clear winner, ranking it as the most widely searched style in 33 states. Representing core American values in a contemporary light, this result was not too surprising. It’s a gorgeous take on traditional design creating a seamless blend of old and new with sleek lines, neutral tones, and alluring materials. When the style first started being showcased and popularized across various home design shows, the whole country nearly fell in love with it.

Following in second behind the modern farmhouse is the rustic style. This design takes advantage of the outdoors and brings a taste of the natural beauty to the interior. Rustic design is all about creating a cozy and inviting atmosphere, and incorporating elements from nature. Using rugged, organic materials, this approach creates an easy going, care free feel to a space boasting the home’s authenticity. This style was most popular in states that greatly admire their outdoors including Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Pennsylvania.

In third place, is the coastal style. Coastal interior design has become increasingly popular in recent years, and for good reason. This style is all about creating a relaxed and comfortable living space that is inspired by the beauty of the where the ocean meets the sand. Soft, muted colors like blues, greens, and sandy neutrals are combined with nautical materials to create exciting yet and calming interiors. This was most popular in states that hugged the country’s shorelines including California, Florida, South Carolina, and Georgia.

Other popular interior design styles included Feng Shui, mid-century modern, Mediterranean, industrial design, Southwestern, Victorian, and eclectic design. Overall, the diversity of home design styles across the United States is a reflection each region’s rich history and the unique influences that have shaped each state.

5 places to visit during Restaurant Week in Greenville, SC

Get your reservations ready. Restaurant Week South Carolina kicks off Thursday, Jan. 12 and runs through Sunday, Jan. 22.Whether you’re looking to try something new or visit an old favorite, participating restaurants offer special deals (think: three courses for a set price or dinner for two at a discounted rate) to entice Greenvillians to get...

Get your reservations ready. Restaurant Week South Carolina kicks off Thursday, Jan. 12 and runs through Sunday, Jan. 22.

Whether you’re looking to try something new or visit an old favorite, participating restaurants offer special deals (think: three courses for a set price or dinner for two at a discounted rate) to entice Greenvillians to get out and eat local.

Pro tip: Bookmark the full lineup to peep the menus and make reservations.

We were excited to see this casual lunch spot in Overbrook on the Restaurant Week lineup. You can’t go wrong with any of the $12 lunch specials — which come with a side and a tea. We’ll be trying the “Mama’s Boy” — house-made meatloaf, onion bacon jam, tomato barbecue sauce, and sharp cheddar cheese on sourdough sandwich bread.

Indulge in three courses for $45. We’re starting with the yellowfin tuna crudo (with mango, shallot, fresno chile, and lemon gel), then enjoying the fusilli (with lamb sausage, fennel, piquillo peppers, and pecorino romano), and finishing with the key lime panna cotta (with cherry compote and almond crumb).

Looking for a unique Restaurant Week experience? Start by selecting wine or bouron and you’ll receive a $20 flight of chocolates that pair perfectly with your preference.

Three courses for $60? Yes please. Chef Haydn Shaak had us at brussells + pancetta (with calabrian chilis, wildflower honey, fennel pollen, and pecorino), whey braised short rib (with lardo potatoes, wild mushrooms, shallots, and truffle demi), and apple olive oil cake (with salted whey caramel, pistachio butter, and cinnamon whip).

If you’re looking for a spot with deals for lunch and dinner, look no further than three courses for $40 at Southern Culture. Kick off your meal with the creole caesar salad, enjoy the peppercorn herb crusted prime rib (with redskin mashed potatoes, sauteed mixed vegetables, a horseradish cream sauce and a Dijon au jus sauce), and wash it all down with a slice of rum cake a la mode with caramel drizzle.

Greenville’s food writer: Here’s what I want to eat for Restaurant Week South Carolina

How are those New Year’s Resolutions going so far? The thing is, I feel like we are sometimes misguided, or perhaps too singularly focused on food when we make those resolutions. Health is about much more.I get the need to recalibrate, absolutely. But if you ask me about the thing that would truly benefit my health the most this year, it would be time. Time with friends, time with my family, time to sit and watch my kids play, and time to enjoy good meals.That’s why, while I know it’s a new year, I’m exc...

How are those New Year’s Resolutions going so far? The thing is, I feel like we are sometimes misguided, or perhaps too singularly focused on food when we make those resolutions. Health is about much more.

I get the need to recalibrate, absolutely. But if you ask me about the thing that would truly benefit my health the most this year, it would be time. Time with friends, time with my family, time to sit and watch my kids play, and time to enjoy good meals.

That’s why, while I know it’s a new year, I’m excited about Restaurant Week South Carolina.

This 11-day period, Jan. 12-23, is meant to infuse local restaurants with diners during a time of year that is traditionally slow. It’s a chance for diners to get a taste of restaurants, new and old favs, at a discounted cost. Most restaurants offer a prix fixe menu ranging from $12 to $60 that, when broken down, is a real deal.

This year, there are nearly 60 restaurants participating across the Upstate. Some offer lunch and some dinner, and some takeout options, as well.

Here’s what looks exciting to me — full fat, fried, sauced and all.

For more information and a look at all the participating restaurants and their menus, visit https://restaurantweeksouthcarolina.com

A quick note: You can’t go wrong no matter where you choose to dine. And remember, that while menu prices are set, gratuity is not included so tip accordingly and kindly.

Larkin’s

I know Larkin’s is known for its steaks, but I’m more interested in trying some of the seafood dishes that are part of executive chef Jon Buck’s touch. Since joining the team in the spring, Buck, who helmed the kitchen at Husk Greenville, has been adding locally sourced produce and sustainable seafood, along with fresh pasta.

Maestro’s Dinner Club

My daughter has recently developed a fondness for duck, so the marinated duck here seems like a lovely opportunity for a mommy-daughter dinner out.

CAMP

I’ve not been to CAMP as much as I’d like, but every visit leaves me impressed. Sitting at the Chef’s bar can be tight, but it’s always a pleasure, thanks to the jovial and very talented staff. How they cook and interact at the same time I’ll never know. Drew Erickson and Diego Campos and their team have created not just wonderful food but a lovely atmosphere.

Stella’s Southern Brasserie

Like CAMP, I’ve not been to Stella’s in a long while, but every time I’ve gone in the past, it’s always been a wonderful meal. And while it makes for a great date night, Stella’s has always been so accommodating to kids too (just dine on the earlier side). And even if it’s not part of the prix fixe menu, I will definitely order anything with mushrooms. Chances are they are locally foraged, and possibly even by executive chef Anthony Gray himself.

Fork & Plough

I feel like if anyone can do fried catfish and veal cutlet marsala well, it’s Shawn Kelly and the team at Fork & Plough. Plus, this spot is convenient and my kids love it — win-win!

And while key lime panna cotta sounds delightful in the depths of winter, I’d likely get dessert to go and hit up Clare’s Creamery next door for some of their new ice cream flavors. Orange cardamom, yes please!

Bonjour Main Nights

I’ve been meaning to try the new evening concept inside Bonjour Main since it launched in November, if no other reason than because chef Rogelio Rojas’ menu looks divine. Love his unapologetic fusion cuisine. Where else can you find Venezuelan chicken curry, kibbeh and patatas bravas and flan on a menu and it have it somehow make sense?

LaRue Fine Chocolate

Elizabeth McDaniel’s chocolates are true culinary delights. And nothing sounds more delightful than this $20 wine, bourbon and chocolate pairing with a friend.

Southwest Florida golf: 2022 Terra Cotta Invitational first-round tee times at Naples National

Naples Daily NewsTerra Cotta Invitationalat Naples National Golf ClubFriday's first-round pairingsNo. 1 Tee8 a.m. — Boyd Owens, Baton Rouge, La.; Sam Kodak, Naples; Matthew Cornegys, Van Alstyne, Texas8:11 a.m. — Dagbjartur Sigurbrandsson, Iceland; P.J. Maybank, Cheboygan, Mich.; William Love, Atlanta8:22 a.m. — Nicholas Prieto, Miami; Jake Peacock, Milton, Ga.; Jonathan Griz, Hilton Head, S.C.8:33 a.m...

Naples Daily News

Terra Cotta Invitational

at Naples National Golf Club

Friday's first-round pairings

No. 1 Tee

8 a.m. — Boyd Owens, Baton Rouge, La.; Sam Kodak, Naples; Matthew Cornegys, Van Alstyne, Texas

8:11 a.m. — Dagbjartur Sigurbrandsson, Iceland; P.J. Maybank, Cheboygan, Mich.; William Love, Atlanta

8:22 a.m. — Nicholas Prieto, Miami; Jake Peacock, Milton, Ga.; Jonathan Griz, Hilton Head, S.C.

8:33 a.m. — Ty Gingerich, Carmel, Ind.; Lucas Fallotico, Italy; Grant Haefner, Bloomfield Hills, Mich.

8:44 a.m. — Mykhailo Golod, Ukraine; Aaron Pounds, The Woodlands, Texas; Andrew McLaughlin, Neptune Beach

8:55 a.m. — Joe Pagdin, England; Jacob Sosa, Austin, Texas; Kiko Coelho, Portugal

9:06 a.m. — Caleb Surratt, Indian Trail, N.C.; Ben James, Milford, Conn.; Kyle De Beer, South Africa

9:17 a.m. — Frank Kennedy, England; Nick Maccario, Waltham, Mass.; Conner Creasy, Abingdon, Va.

9:28 a.m. — Tommy Morrison, Dallas; Wells Williams, West Point, Miss.; Luke Potter, Encinitas, Calif.

9:39 a.m. — Alexandre Vandermoten, France; Pierre Viallaneix, France; Jean-Phillippe Parr, Canada

9:50 a.m. — Jon Hopkins, Fort Myers; Cody Paladino, West Hartford, Conn.; Andy Fogarty, Naples

10:01 a.m. — Jeff Champine, Rochester Hills, Mich.; Brian Bassett, Naples; Joe Alfieri, Lutz

10:12 a.m. — Giovanni Manzoni, Italy; Justin Burrowes, Jamaica; Clemente Silva, Chile

No. 10 Tee

7:55 a.m. — James Tureskis, Naples; Ryan Terry, Nashville; Nicholas Gross, Downington, Pa.

8:06 a.m. — Garrett Jones, Fitchburg, Wis.; John Daly II, Dardanville, Ark.; Noah Kent, Naples

8:17 a.m. — Sean-Karl Dobson, Austin, Texas; Ben Cohn, Ecuador; Jack Irons, Naples

8:28 a.m. — Charlie Davis, Naples; Jack Turner, Orlando; Sihan Sandhu, Pinehurst, N.C.

8:39 a.m. — Evan Woosley-Reed, Shelbyville, Tenn.; Keaton Vo, Austin, Texas; Luke Poulter, England

8:50 a.m. — Eric Lee, Fullerton, Calif.; Jay Brooks, Boca Raton; Felix Bouchard, Canada

9:01 a.m. — Johnny Spellerberg, Bennington, Neb.; Carl Santos-Ocampo, Naples; Joseph Lloyd, Scottsdale, Ariz.

9:12 a.m. — Drew Pranger, St. Louis; Bryan Lee, Fairfax, Va.; William Jennings, Greenville, S.C.

9:23 a.m. — Filip Jakubcik, Czech Republic; Luke Clanton, Miami Lakes; Max Herendeen, Bellevue, Wash.

9:34 a.m. — Hampton Roberts, Cary, N.C.; Owen Kim, Canada; Michael LaSasso, Raleigh, N.C.

9:45 a.m. — Marc Engellenner, Rocklin, Calif.; John DuBois, Windermere; Austin Cherichella, Winter Springs

9:56 a.m. — Jonas Appel, Encinitas, Calif.; Remi Chartier, Canada; John Broderick, Wellesley Hills, Mass.

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